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Monthly Archives: April 2017

Law School Admission

Creating a Good Impression

Academic records, essays and interviews all affect how you will be viewed by the law school admissions board. What you wear, how you communicate and why you want to be a lawyer are all considered. Pay attention to the questions posed on paper and in person. Answer them directly and succinctly. Be honest and don’t try to hide the truth. Turn in all items on time, completed as requested and with neatness. For an interview, dress appropriately and don’t be late.

Financing

Have a plan for how you plan to pay for college. Gaining acceptance to the law school of your choice means little if you can’t attend. There are several ways to pay for school. Many students use a mixture of them to afford tuition, living expenses and class materials. A law school student loan is one possibility. It can be secured through the federal government, the school or through a private loan. Choose carefully where to apply. Each school application costs money, so if you can’t possibly gain admission because certain requirements aren’t met, don’t bother sending in an application. If you are limited to how many schools you can afford to send in applications for, consider using money from an educational loan.

Choosing a College

Simply because a university has a solid reputation or a family member went there, it doesn’t mean you should automatically attend. The right atmosphere, location, price tag, academic standing and educational philosophy are all serious considerations for potential students. Before attending an interview or filling out an application and writing an essay, do some research on the university. Find out what they place high on their list of credentials. Some are more concerned with grades, while others have strict limitations on LSAT scores. They may want to know why you want to attend their institution in particular, as opposed to attending other schools. Have a valid answer ready.

Make Difference for Students

Academic Educator vs. Subject Matter Expert

From my experience, I have discovered there are two distinct perspectives of the work that educators perform. One perspective is a result of the traditional role of an educator, who is working full time at a college or university and has dedicated their career to the development of their instructional practice. They are working to become a teaching expert and usually have strong subject matter expertise, along with a highly developed academic background. This type of educator has dedicated their career to helping students learn, conducting research, publishing, and furthering their scholarly expertise.

The other perspective of an instructional practice is based upon those educators who are working as adjuncts. Online teaching was a thriving career up until a few years ago, when the for-profit industry came under intense scrutiny. Approximately ten years ago, there were more jobs than adjuncts and now that trend has reversed. The primary difference between adjuncts in this field and traditional instructors is that online adjuncts are often hired not because they were academics, rather they are practitioners in a field related to the subject being taught. When someone teaches a class without an academic background, their primary focus is often on the need to manage a class and complete the facilitation requirements.

What does this mean for the classroom learning experience? Is one type of educator more effective than the other? I believe that it is a matter of perspective. An academic educator is going to better understand the learning process and how to educate adults. A subject matter expert, as an instructor, may be able to provide the necessary context for learning and that means either educator can be effective. I chose to bridge the two types of educators by choosing postsecondary and adult education as the major for my doctoral degree, to add to the business and business management subject matter expertise I already had acquired. However, that only tells part of reason why my work with students has made a difference for them as knowing how adults learn is part of the equation but not the complete answer.

How You Can Make a Difference for Your Students

Regardless of which type of background you have as an educator, I have discovered that what makes a difference for students is the attitude and disposition an instructor holds about learning, along with their ability to see a potential for growth in every student – and how they are able to relate to and work with their students. Below are three areas for self-assessment that you can use to determine if you have had, or could have now, a positive impact on the learning and development of your students.

#1. Do you do what you say you will do? What you say to your students matters, along with what you say you will do and then what you actually do. For example, do you state that you are easily accessible and responsive to their needs, but then you are slow to answer questions or unwilling to provide assistance that actually helps them? When you state that you care about their academic needs, how do you show it?

Students may forget what you state or what you have written, but they will usually remember what you have done. As an example, if a student has asked a question and received a timely response, especially one that is meaningful and demonstrates a caring tone, they will remember that and likely seek assistance again when needed. It goes back to the saying that “actions speak louder than words” – and I’m certain this is something you have experienced yourself.

#2. Do you want to make a short term or long term impact? Have you ever taken time to consider the impact of your teaching practice? If so, what kind of impact do you want to have on your student’s academic life? When your goal as an instructor is to complete the required facilitation duties and assist students only when they request help, the impact that you will have on their learning experience will likely be short-term and soon forgotten. In contrast, if you are cultivating relationships with your students and you are focused on their academic success and ongoing persistence, your impact is likely to be more long-term or memorable.

You may not know the full extent of how you have helped your students if you work with them for only one class; however, the long-term effect is one that will be transformative as they continue working towards completion of their academic goals. You may also never know about the impact you have made if your students are not directly responding to you. But the smallest of gestures made by you, done with a genuine concern for the well-being of your students, may influence them in a positive manner both now and in the future.

Lessons College Students

Make Something Better – If students want a good job when they graduate, they cannot wait until the second semester of their senior year to get started. In college, students have 2, 4 or 6 years to prove themselves. Employers believe that it is plenty of time for students to demonstrate their capabilities. If students choose to coast during the college years, it is likely that they will still be coasting (and waiting) after they graduate.

Accept Responsibility And Demonstrate Their Capabilities – Mature, highly respected students seek opportunities to demonstrate their capabilities and expect to be held accountable for their words, actions, performance and results. They are reliable and can be counted on to get the tough things done on time and with a high degree of quality.

These students do not blame others when things go wrong and don’t make excuses for their own mistakes and failures. Rather, they admit their mistakes, apologize for the problems they caused and set about making things right.

Show Others They Deserve Respect – The most respected students do the right things, perform well, are quick to give credit to others and always express their appreciation to everyone who has helped. They demonstrate good manners and resist the urge to overreact or behave as an immature child might in a stressful situation. Respected students sometimes lead, but regularly support their friends and other students who are getting important things done. Importantly, they keep their promises and can be trusted.

Build Relationships With High Performing and Influential People – For students to be successful, other people must want them to be successful. True success seldom comes to people who are self-centered loners. We all need and depend on others to help us. Students build solid relationships when they put others first, build them up and look out for their best interests.

Info of Online Graduate School

Students who wish to attend graduate school online will need to have access to a computer that is hooked up to the Internet. Online programs allow students to interact with their teachers in an online format either by email, online discussion groups or chat rooms. Students either receive their assignments via email or in an online forum that the teacher sets up for students to access their assignments. Online graduate programs are great for students who are self-motivated and do not need the interaction with professors and peers to get through their classes. Some online programs have online “classes” where students meet online at a specified time in a virtual classroom. Other online programs allow students to work at their own pace, at least to some degree. Once an assignment has been completed, students can move on to the next assignment. Online graduate programs are flexible so that students can sign-on to their computers at a time that is convenient for them.

Just like when you are choosing an on-campus graduate program, you should look for certain things in an online graduate programs.

1. Accreditation. Accreditation means that the school has been granted credit or recognition that it maintains suitable standards. Accreditation is a credit that is acknowledged by educational institutions around the country.

2. Proven Online Success. Some online degree programs have technology problems or issues with their curriculum format. Talk with other students that have earned their degree online and make sure that there weren’t any major flaws with the school’s way of conducting their online program.

3. Technology & Support. Be sure that the online program has technical support available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, in case you need them when you are online. Inquire as to what type of technology your computer needs to be able to process so that you can make sure you have enough memory and the appropriate Internet connection (DSL, Broadband, etc.). Many online universities are starting to use technology like video streaming, whiteboard, and video conferencing. If you are not equipped for this type of technology then you may need to seek classes that are conducted via other technologies, such as e-mail, bulletin boards, and websites.